Manhattan Project National Historical Park by Reenie Mooney

Design By:
Reenie Mooney is a freelance graphic designer in Knoxville, TN who creates cover art, posters, and packages for bands, writers, and arts organizations as well as a number of label graphics for Sugarlands Shine.
Design By:
Reenie Mooney is a freelance graphic designer in Knoxville, TN who creates cover art, posters, and packages for bands, writers, and arts organizations as well as a number of label graphics for Sugarlands Shine.

Each poster is hand-printed and handled, to make sure that only the highest quality is offered and sent out. The matte paper and high quality of inks make for a vibrant image which looks great both framed, and au-naturel. Printed in Los Angeles, CA, on Epson Enhanced Matte Paper, heavyweight stock, high color gamut, using Epson UltraChrome HDR ink-jet technology. Framed posters offer the same, museum-quality printed poster, but wrapped in a protective black frame. The frame is lightweight and includes a shatter-resistant acrylite front protector, so it won't break in the mail. International orders may be subject to customs duties & taxes.

Proceeds Support:
Proceeds support National Parks Conservation Association, the independent, nonpartisan voice working to strengthen and protect our nation’s natural, historical, and cultural heritage.

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Artist Statement

In 1942, more than 15,000 people came to work and live at Clinton Engineer Works (The Secret City), a massive industrial complex nestled in the hills of what would become Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Here, men and women worked on enriching uranium for the Little Boy bomb. The combined employment peak (production staff, operating force, and construction labor) was 80,000. Today The American Museum of Science and Energy provides bus tours to this Smithsonian Affiliated site. The poster is based on a photograph by, Ed Westcott, the official photographer for the Manhattan Project during WWII. The public domain image shows a worker at a calutron in Y-12 where uranium was extracted. - Reenie Mooney