Forward, For Them by James Nesbitt

Design By:
James Nesbitt

I am an award-winning Artist + Designer living in Seattle. I focus on digital experiences and film, but also create visceral, interactive art and hand-crafted goods. My work has been featured in Graphis, Seattle Show, GD USA, Print, Step 100, Addys, Taschen, Tellys, Prentice-Hall, and several US film festivals.

Design By:
James Nesbitt

I am an award-winning Artist + Designer living in Seattle. I focus on digital experiences and film, but also create visceral, interactive art and hand-crafted goods. My work has been featured in Graphis, Seattle Show, GD USA, Print, Step 100, Addys, Taschen, Tellys, Prentice-Hall, and several US film festivals.

Each poster is hand-printed and handled, to make sure that only the highest quality is offered and sent out. The matte paper and high quality of inks make for a vibrant image which looks great both framed, and au-naturel. Printed in Los Angeles, CA, on Epson Enhanced Matte Paper, heavyweight stock, high color gamut, using Epson UltraChrome HDR ink-jet technology. Framed posters offer the same, museum-quality printed poster, but wrapped in a protective black frame. The frame is lightweight and includes a shatter-resistant acrylite front protector, so it won't break in the mail. International orders may be subject to customs duties & taxes.

Proceeds Support:
Proceeds support DreamCorps, a social justice accelerator founded by Van Jones that advances economic, environmental, and criminal justice solutions. Started in 2008 and revived in 2012, Design For Obama is a grassroots collection of posters from artists around the country that helped elect Barack Obama as President. Select designs from the 2008 collection were published as a coffee table book with filmmaker and activist Spike Lee and design author and historian Steven Heller.

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Artist Statement

This poster, from the 2016 election, was focused on how important it was for young kids of color to have a president that looked like them, in effect saying, "Yes You Can." — James Nesbitt