Bridge Jack Mesa, Bears Ears National Monument by Rodney Buxton

Design By:
Rodney Buxton

Rodney is an associate professor in the Media, Film and Journalism Studies Department at the University of Denver. He teaches film and television studies as well as digital video production. Photography is an extension of his teaching interests.

 

Design By:
Rodney Buxton

Rodney is an associate professor in the Media, Film and Journalism Studies Department at the University of Denver. He teaches film and television studies as well as digital video production. Photography is an extension of his teaching interests.

 

Each poster is hand-printed and handled, to make sure that only the highest quality is offered and sent out. The matte paper and high quality of inks make for a vibrant image which looks great both framed, and au-naturel. Printed in Los Angeles, CA, on Epson Enhanced Matte Paper, heavyweight stock, high color gamut, using Epson UltraChrome HDR ink-jet technology. Framed posters offer the same, museum-quality printed poster, but wrapped in a protective black frame. The frame is lightweight and includes a shatter-resistant acrylite front protector, so it won't break in the mail. International orders may be subject to customs duties & taxes.

Proceeds Support:

Proceeds support National Parks Conservation Association, the independent, nonpartisan voice working to strengthen and protect our nation’s natural, historical, and cultural heritage. See America is reviving the legacy of the New Deal arts projects by building a new collection of posters celebrating our shared natural landmarks and treasured sites. Explore the full collection here.

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Artist Statement

Representing the vanishing present of my own perspective and the fleeting nature of my experiences, these digital paintings capture the vanishing presence of geological formations in several U.S. National Parks, as they struggle against the effects of climate change, threats of industrialized exploitation and commercial over-development. Presently, an experience within any national park can change relatively quickly as external, non-natural forces impact the landscape in a short span of years rather than over centuries. This intersection of my vanishing present and the parks’ vanishing presence forms the basis for my own sense of neo-nostalgia – as my attempts to appreciate and capture various national parks through my transient experience in them. Conventionally, when one evokes the concept of nostalgia, it is a retrograde longing and romanticism for objects, values and attitudes of many decades or even centuries long past. Visually, images of these objects, values and experiences tend to be rendered in sepia and muted color tones. However, in visiting national parks such as Bryce Canyon National Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, the Grand Canyon and Yellowstone National Park, my experiences and memories are much more vivid. For me, neo-nostalgia is the recognition of the fleeting present, steeped in vibrant, almost hallucinogenic saturated visual tones that I present in these digital watercolors. This approach enhances the inherent drama of nature’s monuments, in both perseverance and uncertainty. These pieces are my responses to the awe of nature’s beauty, fears about the destruction of that beauty, and the hope that this destruction from outside human forces can be stopped and reversed in some manner. — Rodney Buxton