A Comical History by Joshua Sierra

Design By:
Joshua Sierra

Joshua is a freelance artist currently living in Los Angeles, CA.

 

Design By:
Joshua Sierra

Joshua is a freelance artist currently living in Los Angeles, CA.

 

Each poster is hand-printed and handled, to make sure that only the highest quality is offered and sent out. The matte paper and high quality of inks make for a vibrant image which looks great both framed, and au-naturel. Printed in Los Angeles, CA, on Epson Enhanced Matte Paper, heavyweight stock, high color gamut, using Epson UltraChrome HDR ink-jet technology. Framed posters offer the same, museum-quality printed poster, but wrapped in a protective black frame. The frame is lightweight and includes a shatter-resistant acrylite front protector, so it won't break in the mail. International orders may be subject to customs duties & taxes.

Artist Statement

America is awesome...Through the pulp crime daily, the fantasy short, the daily humor strip, tales of romance and tales of horror, the innovative, bizarre and sometimes strangely erotic sci-fi comic books of the past decades comics have depicted our dreams, hopes, fears, ambitions, goals and the ideals of our country, while keeping us entertained and instilling us with patriotism and the audacity to dream. As a result comic book characters have become a staple of American culture. While the medium may have shifted, one must only look to the theaters to see how important comics remain as a mainstay in our American Culture. Since a stars and stripes clad Captain knocked out our shared enemy Adolf Hitler, or a billionaire decided to do more than license hotels and destroy casinos, we grew up watching a crusader for the innocent as a Knight of darkness. America has been hooked on Comics, and that is why Comics Make America Great. This collage piece was made utilizing classic 1950-80 style comic book fonts and covers I was able to find. I made this out of my love and appreciation for this type of detailed artwork, and to remind anyone who is in despair, facing the actions of a archetypal comic book villain, to remind them that a comic book hero is almost surely close to follow and save the day. — Joshua Sierra